COLLECTIVE DESIGN FAIR 2017, NEW YORK

Posted 06 May 2017

Collective Design brings together creative voices from around the world in a lively, essential discourse on modern and contemporary design and art. Based in New York City and active in the arts community throughout the year, Collective Design presents engaging conversations and educational programs to foster dialogue, encourage the exchange of ideas, and build a growing audience for collectible design and art

The Collective Concept installation nods to the radical architectural firm Superstudio and their investigations into the grid and speculative city interventions – most notably for New York City.

Throughout modern history the grid has not only served as a tool to enable advancements in design, architecture and the visual arts, but also proven to be a symbol of repressive force through its strict conventions. By placing the grid on a gentle fabric and fading until it cannot be seen anymore, Christopher Boots illustrates that these constructs can and need to be disrupted.

Placing the artworks within this environment, heightened by their natural material qualities, proposes that there are alternatives to our current reality.  Similarly to Superstudio’s desire for the grid to mediate and give equality and freedom to space, these new works reveal that through the addition of beauty the idea of creating ‘environments for love at first sight’ is not that radical.

Christopher Boots was excited to exhibit a one of a kind vanity screen – a project of love that has taken four years to realize. All pieces incorporate clear and smokey quartz crystal to examine both the dark and light of our times.

All work displayed at Collective Design Fair were unique artist pieces and are being exhibited for the very first time.

Light in a future that emerges from darkness.

Photography by Lauren Coleman

Photography by Christine Francis

Photography by Lauren Coleman

 

Photography by Lauren Coleman

Photography by Lauren Coleman

Photography by Lauren Coleman

Photography by Christine Francis